#NSWASCIWIRE

Recent work by our members

#nswasciwire highlights the published writing of NSWA members each month. Would you like to see your writing featured? Please suggest an item online or send a link or PDF file to Chris Tachibana at sciencewire@nwscience.org. The NSWA Board of Directors determines what material to present. We look forward to highlighting your work.

Solomon: Cute Even When Dead

Veterinary pathologists are busy up north, writes Chris Solomon. In Outside Magazine, he profiles one of the overworked scientists, who talks about dissecting bears, whales, and the adorable, but dead, sea otter. What’s causing the deaths? Read the piece and ask Chris...

Yan: What Doesn’t Kill You

CO, carbon monoxide, is a toxin. But Wudan Yan found a physician-researcher in New York who says it could be therapeutic—in amounts much lower than the lethal dose, of course. Read Wudan’s piece in STAT, and come ask her about it and her career in international...

Rochman: The Genome Generation

Bonnie Rochman has written about parenting and she has written about genetic testing. Her new book, The Gene Machine: How Genetic Technologies Are Changing the Way We Have Kids—and the Kids We Have is about both, based in deep reporting and personal experience. Get...

Yonck: An Emotional Future

What comes after Siri and self-driving cars? Richard Yonck posits that the next step could be technology that recognizes human feelings. His new book, Heart of the Machine: Our Future in a World of Artificial Emotional Intelligence explores the rewards and pitfalls of...

Kwok: Shakespeare’s Tarts

Handwritten manuscripts from the 16th century are tough going for modern readers, writes Roberta Kwok in The New Yorker. But everyday letters and recipes, in addition to famous plays from the era, are a guide to the evolution of our language. Roberta tells of a...