#NSWASCIWIRE

Recent work by our members

#nswasciwire highlights the published writing of NSWA members each month. Would you like to see your writing featured? Please suggest an item online or send a link or PDF file to Chris Tachibana at sciencewire@nwscience.org. The NSWA Board of Directors determines what material to present. We look forward to highlighting your work.

Kantor: Save the Marten

It's a weasel-like carnivore not much bigger than a kitten and was thought to be extinct. Sylvia Kantor describes the Humboldt marten in a report for Science Findings for the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station. The rare subspecies of the Pacific...

Stavney: Farm v. Wild

The debate on your plate, if you're a salmon enthusiast, is about farmed versus wild-caught salmon. Eric Stavney draws on his background as a biology teacher for an informative two-part series on the topic for The Norwegian American. Learn about the nutrition and...

DeWeerdt: Finbook

The Southern Resident orcas have strong social networks, writes Sarah DeWeerdt for Encyclopedia of Puget Sound, from the Puget Sound Institute, University of Washington. Sarah's piece tells detailed family stories about orcas that bond in matriarchal groups, share...

Lindley: Huntington History

Eugenics, frontal lobotomies, and a link (inaccurate) between Huntington disease and the Salem witch trials. It's all in Robin Lindley's conversation with Dr. Tom Bird, a medical pioneer and University of Washington researcher. For History News Network, Robin...

Yan: Mystery D

Vitamin D is essential. Or at least that's what we all thought. Wudan Yan, for the New York Times, writes about the mystifying case of a patient with no detectable circulating vitamin D in her blood. The woman had bone disease, but experts thought that with her...