#NSWASCIWIRE

Recent work by our members

#nswasciwire highlights the published writing of NSWA members each month. Would you like to see your writing featured? Please suggest an item online or send a link or PDF file to Chris Tachibana at sciencewire@nwscience.org. The NSWA Board of Directors determines what material to present. We look forward to highlighting your work.

Wiedenhoft: Next Foodie Trend?

Gooseneck barnacles just got a nudge closer to our dinner plates. Heather Wiedenhoft, writing in Hakai magazine, explains that they are difficult to harvest and vulnerable to overfishing. She talks with a University of Oregon researcher who is making crucial...

Fore: Because It’s Slick?

Why is ice slippery? Meredith Fore knows. In a piece for Live Science, Meredith first debunks myths (like the one we all believed about the ice surface melting as you stand on it, so you glide on the water). Then she talks to two scientists, who are collaborators and...

Rickey: An Atom’s-Eye View

For decades, writes Tom Rickey, NWChem has been the go-to software for computational chemists who need atom-level visualizations of molecules. A scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory who developed NWChem is now giving the software a boost, writes Tom...

Kwok: Lab Cultures

In a feature for Nature, Roberta Kwok asks scientists who have worked abroad about culture shock—Not from discovering a contaminated flask of media, but from moving to a place with new norms, customs, and social expectations. Roberta (@robertakwok) gets advice about...

Doughton: Politics Trumps Thanksgiving

You're not imagining the impact of politics on your family gatherings, Sandi Doughton writes. Researchers from Washington State University showed—in part by using smartphone location data—that political divisions may have truncated 2016 Thanksgiving visits. Sandi's...