#NSWASCIWIRE

Recent work by our members

#nswasciwire highlights the published writing of NSWA members each month. Would you like to see your writing featured? Please suggest an item online or send a link or PDF file to Chris Tachibana at sciencewire@nwscience.org. The NSWA Board of Directors determines what material to present. We look forward to highlighting your work.

Gibbs: Bread and Bioconductor

For Nature News and Comment, Wayt Gibbs (@WaytGibbs) offers a practical description of Bioconductor, a software toolkit for genomic data. Wayt includes a zippy demonstration video in which he uses Bioconductor to analyze gene expression data “all in an...

Watts: Forest Trade-offs

Timber, carbon storage, and wildlife habitat, Andrea Watts writes, are just some of the functions of our national forests. Andrea shows how the Pacific Northwest Research Station helps the U.S. Forest Service balance these multiple demands by modeling the effects of...

Sharpe: Supercharging Student Research

University of Washington students have access to a superpower, writes Elizabeth Sharpe in UW IT Connect. Elizabeth shows how access to the UW Hyak supercomputer is helping students from departments all over the university—engineering, medicine, arts and sciences, and...

Nijhuis: Best of 2017

In case you missed it: Michelle Nijhuis’ story for National Geographic, How the parks of tomorrow will be different, was included the the 2017 collection The Best American Science and Nature Writing, edited by Hope Jahren. Take a tour with Michelle (@nijhuism)...

Barlow: Positive Negative Results

Negative results can be groundbreaking, Jim Barlow writes in a story for Around the O, with news from the University of Oregon. Jim (@jebarlow) explains how UO scientists tried—and failed—to use computer simulations to predict how a protein would be affected by string...